Research Article: Antibacterial and osteogenic stem cell differentiation properties of photoinduced TiO2 nanoparticle-decorated TiO2 nanotubes

An overarching theme of the Nanomedicine Special Focus Issue on ‘Engineering the nanoenvironment for regenerative medicine’ is the regulation of cellular function through nanotopographical modification. In this article, Liu et al. present research on the fabrication of titania nanotubes anodized into titanium and how these may be employed to improve the materials antibacterial and cell compatibility properties. Specifically the authors show that these surfaces induce significant downregulations in glycosytransferase genes in Streptococcus mutans populations and improved osteogenic functions in human stem cells, noting that this may provide a powerful methodology to improve orthopedic and dental implant efficacy.

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Apr 01, 2015
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Aim: To improve the antibacterial and mammalian cell compatibility properties of titania nanotubes (TNTs) anodized into titanium (Ti). Materials & methods: 3–8-nm TiO2 nanoparticles were decorated on the surface and inside TNT (TNT-TiO2) through a hydrothermal method. After UV light treatment, two types of oral bacteria and stem cells were cultured on the samples to determine antibacterial and compatibility properties. Results: TiO2 nanoparticles increased the surface area and photocatalysis of TNTs. Based on the photocatalysis effect and prolonged photo-induced wettability, the numbers of Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis were lower on the surface of TNT-TiO2 than pure Ti and TNTs after the first 7 days. Specifically, for S. mutans, the glycosytransferase (gtf) genes were downregulated 0.1–0.2-fold on TNT-TiO2. Due to the different topography and high surface energy of TNT-TiO2, stem cells also showed improved osteogenic functions on TNT-TiO2. Conclusion: In this study, we demonstrated for the first time improved antibacterial properties and, at the same time, greater stem cell osteogenic capacity when decorating TNTs with nanosized TiO2 particles, which may significantly improve orthopedic and dental implant efficacy.

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Author affiliations:

Wenwen Liu

Laboratory of Biomaterials & Biomechanics, Beijing Key Laboratory of Tooth Regeneration & Function Reconstruction, School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University, Tian Tan Xi Li No. 4, Beijing 100050, China

Penglei Su

Photoelectrochemical Research Group, Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, China

Su Chen

Laboratory of Biomaterials & Biomechanics, Beijing Key Laboratory of Tooth Regeneration & Function Reconstruction, School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University, Tian Tan Xi Li No. 4, Beijing 100050, China

Na Wang

Laboratory of Biomaterials & Biomechanics, Beijing Key Laboratory of Tooth Regeneration & Function Reconstruction, School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University, Tian Tan Xi Li No. 4, Beijing 100050, China

Jinshu Wang

Photoelectrochemical Research Group, Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, China

Yiran Liu

Laboratory of Biomaterials & Biomechanics, Beijing Key Laboratory of Tooth Regeneration & Function Reconstruction, School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University, Tian Tan Xi Li No. 4, Beijing 100050, China

Yuanping Ma

Laboratory of Biomaterials & Biomechanics, Beijing Key Laboratory of Tooth Regeneration & Function Reconstruction, School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University, Tian Tan Xi Li No. 4, Beijing 100050, China

Hongyi Li

Photoelectrochemical Research Group, Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, China

Zhenting Zhang

Laboratory of Biomaterials & Biomechanics, Beijing Key Laboratory of Tooth Regeneration & Function Reconstruction, School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University, Tian Tan Xi Li No. 4, Beijing 100050, China

Thomas J Webster

Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA

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Nanomedicine

Journal, Future Science Group

Nanomedicine (Impact Factor: 4.889 [2015]), is an award-winning peer-reviewed journal from Future Science Group, available in both print and online formats. Published 24 times per year, Nanomedicine is a uniquely medicine-focused journal, addressing the important challenges and advances in medical nanoscale-structured material and devices, biotechnology devices and molecular machine systems and nanorobotics, delivering this essential information in concise, clear and attractive article formats. Nanomedicine is listed by Medline/PubMed, Science Citation Index Expanded, Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Current Contents/Life Sciences and the Biotechnology Citation Index. Professor Kostas Kostarelos (Nanomedicine Lab, University of Manchester, UK) and Professor Charles R Martin (University of Florida, FL, USA) are the journal’s Senior Editors. You can find out more about Nanomedicine on our website (http://www.futuremedicine.com/loi/nnm), including the journal’s aims and scope and details of our international editorial board.

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