Research Article: The influence of anisotropic nano- to micro-topography on in vitro and in vivo osteogenesis

An overarching theme of the Nanomedicine Special Focus Issue on ‘Engineering the nanoenvironment for regenerative medicine’ is the regulation of cellular function through nanotopographical modification. Mashinchian et al. present a comprehensive review of the contribution of nanotopography to the field with particular focus on stem cell fate on nanotopographies. In this article, Azeem et al. present research on micro- to nano-scale grooved topographies and how these influence osteoblast function in vitro and bone regeneration in vivo.

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Apr 07, 2015
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Aim: Topographically modified substrates are increasingly used in tissue engineering to enhance biomimicry. The overarching hypothesis is that topographical cues will control cellular response at the cell–substrate interface. Materials & methods: The influence of anisotropically ordered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) substrates (constant groove width of ˜1860 nm; constant line width of ˜2220 nm; variable groove depth of ˜35, 306 and 2046 nm) on in vitro and in vivo osteogenesis were assessed. Results & discussion: We demonstrate that substrates with groove depths of approximately 306 and 2046 nm promote osteoblast alignment parallel to underlined topography in vitro. However, none of the topographies assessed promoted directional osteogenesis in vivo. Conclusion: 2D imprinting technologies are useful tools for in vitro cell phenotype maintenance.

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Author affiliations:

Ayesha Azeem

Network of Excellence for Functional Biomaterials (NFB), Biosciences Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland

Andrew English

Network of Excellence for Functional Biomaterials (NFB), Biosciences Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland

Pramod Kumar

Network of Excellence for Functional Biomaterials (NFB), Biosciences Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland

Abhigyan Satyam

Network of Excellence for Functional Biomaterials (NFB), Biosciences Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland

Manus Biggs

Network of Excellence for Functional Biomaterials (NFB), Biosciences Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland

Eleanor Jones

School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

Bhawana Tripathi

Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures & Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland

Nandita Basu

Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures & Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland

Jan Henkel

Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Cédryck Vaquette

Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Niall Rooney

Proxy Biomedical, Galway, Ireland

Graham Riley

School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

Alan O'Riordan

Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland

Graham Cross

Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures & Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland

Saso Ivanovski

School of Dentistry & Oral Health & Molecular Basis of Disease Program, Griffith University, Southport, Australia

Dietmar Hutmacher

Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Abhay Pandit

Network of Excellence for Functional Biomaterials (NFB), Biosciences Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland

Dimitrios Zeugolis

Network of Excellence for Functional Biomaterials (NFB), Biosciences Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland

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Nanomedicine

Journal, Future Science Group

Nanomedicine (Impact Factor: 4.889 [2015]), is an award-winning peer-reviewed journal from Future Science Group, available in both print and online formats. Published 24 times per year, Nanomedicine is a uniquely medicine-focused journal, addressing the important challenges and advances in medical nanoscale-structured material and devices, biotechnology devices and molecular machine systems and nanorobotics, delivering this essential information in concise, clear and attractive article formats. Nanomedicine is listed by Medline/PubMed, Science Citation Index Expanded, Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Current Contents/Life Sciences and the Biotechnology Citation Index. Professor Kostas Kostarelos (Nanomedicine Lab, University of Manchester, UK) and Professor Charles R Martin (University of Florida, FL, USA) are the journal’s Senior Editors. You can find out more about Nanomedicine on our website (http://www.futuremedicine.com/loi/nnm), including the journal’s aims and scope and details of our international editorial board.

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