Research Article: Human mesenchymal stem cell behavior on femtosecond laser-textured Ti-6Al-4V surfaces

An overarching theme of the Nanomedicine Special Focus Issue on ‘Engineering the nanoenvironment for regenerative medicine’ is the regulation of cellular function through nanotopographical modification. The role of nanotopographical modification in the osteointegration of titanium and titanium alloys is further explored by Cunha et al. who investigate ultrafast laser-surface texturing as a surface treatment of Ti-6Al-4V alloy dental and orthopedic implants to improve the osteoblastic commitment of human mesenchymal stem cells.

Go to the profile of Nanomedicine
Apr 07, 2015
0
0

Aim: The aim of the present work was to investigate ultrafast laser surface texturing as a surface treatment of Ti-6Al-4V alloy dental and orthopedic implants to improve osteoblastic commitment of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Materials & methods: Surface texturing was carried out by direct writing with an Yb:KYW chirped-pulse regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. The surface topography and chemical composition were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Three types of surface textures with potential interest to improve implant osseointegration can be produced by this method: laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs); nanopillars (NPs); and microcolumns covered with LIPSSs, forming a bimodal roughness distribution. The potential of the laser treatment in improving hMSC differentiation was assessed by in vitro study of hMSCs spreading, adhesion, elongation and differentiation using epifluorescence microscopy at different times after cell seeding, after specific stainings and immunostainings. Results: Cell area and focal adhesion area were lower on the laser-textured surfaces than on a polished reference surface. Obviously, the laser-textured surfaces have an impact on cell shape. Osteoblastic commitment was observed independently of the surface topography after 2 weeks of cell seeding. When the cells were cultured (after 4 weeks of seeding) in osteogenic medium, LIPSS- and NP- textured surfaces enhanced matrix mineralization and bone-like nodule formation as compared with polished and microcolumn-textured surfaces. Conclusion: The present work shows that surface nanotextures consisting of LIPSSs and NPs can, potentially, improve hMSC differentiation into an osteoblastic lineage.

Please visit Nanomedicine online to view the article.

Nanomedicine is also on Twitter: follow us @fsgnnm now!

Author affiliations:

Alexandre Cunha

Instituto Superior Técnico-Universidade de Lisboa, CeFEMA-Centro de Física e Engenharia de Materiais Avançados, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 001 Lisbon, Portugal

Omar Farouk Zouani

Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), Bordeaux University, European Institute of Chemistry & Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac, France

Laurent Plawinski

Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), Bordeaux University, European Institute of Chemistry & Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac, France

Ana Maria Botelho do Rego

Instituto Superior Técnico-Universidade de Lisboa, CQFM-Centro de Química-Física Molecular & Institute of Nanoscience & Nanotechnology (IN), Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 001 Lisbon, Portugal

Amélia Almeida

Instituto Superior Técnico-Universidade de Lisboa, CeFEMA-Centro de Física e Engenharia de Materiais Avançados, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 001 Lisbon, Portugal

Rui Vilar

Instituto Superior Técnico-Universidade de Lisboa, CeFEMA-Centro de Física e Engenharia de Materiais Avançados, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 001 Lisbon, Portugal

Marie-Christine Durrieu

Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), Bordeaux University, European Institute of Chemistry & Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac, France

Go to the profile of Nanomedicine

Nanomedicine

Journal, Future Science Group

Nanomedicine (Impact Factor: 4.889 [2015]), is an award-winning peer-reviewed journal from Future Science Group, available in both print and online formats. Published 24 times per year, Nanomedicine is a uniquely medicine-focused journal, addressing the important challenges and advances in medical nanoscale-structured material and devices, biotechnology devices and molecular machine systems and nanorobotics, delivering this essential information in concise, clear and attractive article formats. Nanomedicine is listed by Medline/PubMed, Science Citation Index Expanded, Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Current Contents/Life Sciences and the Biotechnology Citation Index. Professor Kostas Kostarelos (Nanomedicine Lab, University of Manchester, UK) and Professor Charles R Martin (University of Florida, FL, USA) are the journal’s Senior Editors. You can find out more about Nanomedicine on our website (http://www.futuremedicine.com/loi/nnm), including the journal’s aims and scope and details of our international editorial board.

No comments yet.