Human mesenchymal stem cells alter the gene profile of monocytes from patients with Type 2 diabetes and end-stage renal disease

In a Research Article exclusively free for members, Andrea F Wise et al. from Monash University (Australia) investigate investigated whether MSCs can modulate the phenotype of monocytes isolated from Type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease, and therefore have potential for therapeutic intervention.

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Mar 23, 2016
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Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a progressive kidney disease resulting from diabetes, caused by chronic inflammation, and owing to the lack of effective therapies available is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Although the infiltration of monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages is a hallmark of diabetic kidney disease and the number of macrophages correlates with declining renal function in both humans and mice, and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to improve kidney repair, there is limited information on the effects that MSCs have on circulating human monocytes, the progenitors of dendritic cells and macrophages, particularly under chronic inflammatory conditions.

This study by Andrea F Wise et al. from Monash University (Australia) investigated the effects of human bone marrow-derived MSCs on human monocytes isolated from healthy (control) subjects and Type 2 diabetic patients with ESRD, and concludes that modulation of these cells, with the use of MSCs, has potential as a therapeutic approach.

Williams TM, Rudd S, Wells CA, Kerr PG, Ricardo SD, Wise AF. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter the gene profile of monocytes from patients with Type 2 diabetes and end-stage renal disease. Regen. Med. 11(2), 145–158 (2016).

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Regenerative Medicine

Journal, Future Science Group

Regenerative Medicine is an award-winning peer-reviewed journal, in print and web formats. The journal provides a forum to address the important challenges and advances in stem cell research and regenerative medicine, delivering this essential information in concise, clear and attractive article formats. Among other indexing services Regenerative Medicine is listed by MEDLINE/Index Medicus, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Chemical Abstracts, Science Citation Index Expanded™ (SciSearch®), Emcare, Biological Abstracts, BIOSIS Previews, Biotechnology Citation Index®, Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition®, Scopus® with an Impact Factor of 2.786 (2014). Each issue contains expertly drafted Reviews, Original Research articles, Perspectives, Editorials, topical insight from international leaders in their field, and additional added-value content. The Senior Editor of the journal is Professor Chris Mason, University College London. You can find out more about Regenerative Medicine at our website (www.future-science-group.com/journalprofile/regenerative-medicine/), where you can find the aims and scope of the journal and details of our international editorial board.

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