Regenerative medicine in lower limb reconstruction

Written by Regenerative Medicine

This Open Access review evaluates current applications of bone tissue engineering techniques in limb reconstruction and identifies potential strategies for future work.

Bone is a highly specialized connective tissue and has a rare quality as one of the few tissues that can repair without a scar to regain pre-injury structure and function. Despite the excellent healing capacity of bone, tumor, infection, trauma and surgery can lead to significant bone loss requiring skeletal augmentation. Bone loss in the lower limb poses a complex clinical problem, requiring reconstructive techniques to restore form and function.

In the past, amputation may have been the only option; however, there is now an array of reconstructive possibilities and cellular therapies available to salvage a limb. In this Open Access review, published in Regenerative Medicine, Josephine K McEwan et al evaluate current applications of bone tissue engineering techniques in limb reconstruction and identify potential strategies for future work.

Figure 1.‚Primary and secondary bone healing.
(A) Fibula fracture (see arrow). (B) Fibula fracture healed by primary bone healing following open reduction internal fixation (see arrow). (C) Tibia and fibula fracture. (D) Tibia and fibula fracture healed by secondary bone healing with callus formation (see bracket).

McEwan JK, Tribe HS, Jacobs N et al. Regenerative medicine in lower limb reconstruction. Regen.Med. 13(4), 477—490 (2018)